Irritations and Expectations: seeking input

#1

I need input from users. Please, write here what irritate you in WP? Not only Gutenberg, but all other issues. From user, developer, client, agency, etc. view. What you expect from CP? Please write everything, I need more input from various audience.

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What does "Powerful, Versatile, Predictable" mean to you?
How does ClassicPress define Businesses as a target market?
#2

In the last couple of years I’ve been seeing red flags over on WP–not everyone, of course, but certain people involved in WP development with a narcissistic attitude. The debacle over WP-Spamshield–the plugin author feeling bullied–and lo and behold, some of the same people he said bullied him, also bullied people who didn’t want to use Gutenberg. I hope that CP will be more open than WP to input from users and developers.

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#3

My main concern with Wordpress is that it is becoming a victim of its own success. It has become this massive, money-generating enterprise that I now find overwhelming. There are over 54,000 plugins available and who knows how many themes. I find it irritating that whenever I look for an answer for some problem I get pages and pages of results of someone trying to sell me something or sign me up.

The fact that anyone can purchase an existing and popular plugin and “re-purpose” also worries me. Wordpress security is a constant and ongoing concern.

That’s why CP appeals to me. It’s a chance to get back to basics and work with a small and manageable venture.

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#4

First thing (I’ve seen it before Gutenberg, and also disabled TinyMCE, in case it would be the cause for it, but I don’t think it is) is the number of

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You end up with “empty” lines at the bottom of posts. This leads one to pretty much always by default always checking the HTML editor before publishing or updating a posts to check so there’s nbsp; there.

The second issue has to do with the Gutenberg editor. I guess this falls under the accessibility category.

I have poor eyesight and use a Windows high contrast (black background / white text) theme. I have also set so that all pages have black background and white text in FireFox, and overriding whatever colors set by websites.

If I use these settings. There is no way for me to see the text I’ve selected in Gutenberg. Compared with the Classic Editor where it’s possible to.

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#5

I am an end user.
My problem with WordPress is the loss of confidence. Gutenberg is simply a consequence of leadership policy.
I believe that WordPress already is targeting the page builders market.
The leading hosting companies, in the country they i live in now offer a combined service (page builder + hosting). They are, of course, delighted by the WordPress 5.0.
For WorPress leaders, we are simply “Collateral Damage”.

:slight_smile:

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#6

Ah this topic is perfect.

When I started using Wordpress 9 for my blog years ago, it was a lightweight CMS. By the time version 4 came along in 2014 it was getting bloated. TinyMCE has become “heavy-handed” and insists on rewriting your code - I don’t understand why it can’t respect the code that it is given? WP is so bloated now that I had to remove the wp_head() function entirely.

With the switch to CP I’ve also decided to “white-label” the wp_login page. It still loads the original stylesheet, which means it can render with that first before the secondary style-sheet loads. But I shouldn’t need to use functions.php to edit the public-facing login page, there should be some easy simple options from the dashboard to at the very least white-label the login page, perhaps also it should be supported to use one supplied in the theme folder too. If CP is to be “business focused” this should be a logical option - even if the default page will be CP-branded.

What is mentioned by @LinasSimonis in the other thread is true:

I don’t understand the long-term goals and the name “ClassicPress” is misleading, or rather it doesn’t convey the CMS’s primary purpose. Which is OK because it will need time to find its own identity. However this page to me leaves out the meaty problems with Wordpress at present. Which leads me to my last annoyance (well last for this post anyway)…

Security.

The idea that people should use, or be directed to use, “security plugins” is utterly absurd to me. For some people in specific circumstances, perhaps there is a reason, but 99% of people do not need a security plugin if they know the basics of what they’re doing. Which means that Wordpress has been failing in delivering a simple step-by-step guide for setting up a secure Wordpress website. I’ll put this in greater detail separately as a suggestion so it can be properly discussed.

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#7

My top two:

  • General combativeness of those in power to others in the community
  • Lack of willingness to add hooks when reasonably requested by the community
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#8

This has been discussed previously:

If this is something you want to see in ClassicPress core, please leave your vote on the petition. Also a pull request for this change would be very welcome!

Sometimes we do have to push back on things that are not a good idea, or good ideas that are not ready to be implemented yet. However, it is easy to overdo that, and I’d like for ClassicPress to avoid forming “cliques” of people who aren’t open to ideas from people outside of the clique.

If you see this happening here, please tell anyone on the committee and we will make sure it is addressed.

Generally I’m happy to add new hooks to ClassicPress. The only caveats I can think of:

  • we may not want to open the floodgates here - if we add a lot of things all at once then it becomes a source of incompatibility with WordPress.
  • if there is a solid, non-annoying way to do the same thing with existing hooks (may be stating the obvious, but worth stating).
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