What is stopping hosting providers from jumping in?

#1

I hear this often from many hosts and my question (which goes out to you @karthost too) is: What is stopping you and what will it take to make this happen?

The “canned” answer I always get is “We’ll keep an eye on it to see how it progresses then we’ll decide on supporting or not” ~ My thoughts are, almost all hosts are sitting on the fence and the first one to jump off and take action will be the winner :wink:

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US hosting for CP?
#2

Hi Zulfgani

I like your enthusiasm :slight_smile:

Like any new asset class the risks are high (I am talking business in general not just speaking of CP).
It does require resources to put something like that together and since our pockets are not open-ended, we have to be good managers with the resources we have. For anyone, (business or individual) that does take the leap in the early adopter stage the rewards should be greater as you mentioned. Because the risks are greater.

I am sure that isn’t the answer you are looking for but that is an honest answer from a decision maker, not a tech that reports to his manager.

Who knows we could fall into the CP hosting business big time, after all that is our history the way we got started 19 years ago.

Thanks for the discussion.

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#3

My experience with shared hosting on cPanel is that the CMS installations are handled by either Softaculous or Installatron. Is that the case with you @karthost ? (by the way… welcome to the forums and thanks for contributing).

If so, both of these have also said “we’ll keep an eye on the situation” - in other words they are holding off. I suspect it will only be constant pressure from both users and hosting companies that will make them move.

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#4

@karthost and others: If there is anything that ClassicPress can do to make this easier on hosts then we are definitely available to help with that.

Otherwise, the installation process for ClassicPress is not much different from installing WordPress, especially WordPress 4.9.x. Internally installing WordPress and then using our migration plugin would be another option, and we could add features like a WP-CLI command to make this easier, though again this would work best when starting with WP 4.9.x.

Until Softaculous / Installatron / cPanel support ClassicPress, the best option likely depends on the details of each hosting provider’s setup. And generally, software providers like to hear from their actual users about their needs. In this case: if you are a hosting provider, please write your installation software provider an email or support ticket and let them know that your users are asking for ClassicPress!

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#5

Hi Ozfiddler (thank you for the welcome)

Yes, we do have Softaculous, but our WordPress install isn’t Softaculous. In the distant past, I didn’t like the way they installed WordPress, however they have greatly improved. Currently we do have a inhouse installer when clients order a WordPress package. And yes we do still manual installs as well on select clients.

Since we are a client of Softaculous I will be happy to send a recommendation to add ClassicPress to their listing of scripts.

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#6

@james

As mentioned in my last reply, I will send a recommendation to Softaculous to add ClassicPress.

What other (besides auto installs) pain points as it relates to hosting do the ClassicPress community feel needs addressing? That would be helpful to know as well.

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#7

Others are welcome to chime in here too, but I think the only pain point we’ve seen besides making it easy to install ClassicPress is that some hosts have automatic update systems that don’t recognize ClassicPress. There have been some reports of ClassicPress sites getting incorrectly “upgraded” to the latest version of WordPress, for example on Siteground.

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#8

Thanks Roy. That would be fantastic. I feel that requests coming from hosts carry a lot more weight. :+1:

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split this topic #9

2 posts were split to a new topic: Installatron response

#10

I wouldn’t want to deploy it while it still said Beta, so now that that’s gone, it might be picked up more readily.

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